Tuesday, 9 February 2016

The Story of the Collection - Trisha James

We were really pleased today, to welcome Trisha James who gave a really interesting talk on the Embroiderers' Guild Collection of Stitch and Textile Art.

Very intricate embroidery including the Model Boxes which were loaned to individual members for inspiration. The Model boxes were replaced by the larger Laundry Box which in turn were replaced by the Portfolios containing some 1,400 pieces of embroidery.

We learned that the Guild was formed in 1906 and the Embroidery magazine began in 1932.
There are 11,000 pieces stored in Walton-on-Thames headquarters. This figure includes everything, even seperate skeins of thread.
This tiny embroidery is the smallest piece on open weave which is approximately the size of a 5 pence piece
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The largest piece in the collection,"Vision of Ezekiel" by Lorna Rand, is 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 metres  

Major sources are from donations to keep up with current textile art. The Embroiderers' Guild also commissions pieces from textile artists.    
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This is a silk and metal thread embroidery on linen dating back to the early 17th century.
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Roy and Barbara Hirst are specialists in raised work
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A piece donated by Queen Mary. 45" x 45", muslin embroidery with silk thread. Origin Turkey, 1877
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Lady Hamilton Fairley 1970's. Canvas work of a Paynim ( a non-Christian person) 8" x 11"
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We learned of the Grab List - the pieces of work that would be 'grabbed' in the event of a fire. This twentieth century box is on the grab list.

Acquisition consists of *Significant works **Representative of an artist/country etc. ***an acceptance of what is to be done with the donated piece. Whether it is going to be kept in the collection or sold for funds for the Guild.
The Guild has a study library of 3,000 books and 52 categories of books from 1802 to the present day.
Click for OptionsThe Judgement of Solomon. 17th century wool thread on canvas
Click for OptionsThe Beryl Dean Gallery has a display of work which changes every 18 months. Beryl Dean was an Ecclesiastical Embroiderer.
Click for Options16th century Blackwork. A 4 1/2" square. Not a lot of work survives from this period as it was used for wear or for the household use and so consequently the textiles wore out
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House sampler by Mary Goodwin 1786
By the 18th century men and women stitched. Above is a pair of pockets, silk on linen. Pockets were beautifully elaborate but were worn under garments and not seen
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Leek embroidery fragment, 1880-85, the Leek Embroidery Society. These analine dyes were introduced in the 19th century showing brighter colours
Click for OptionsPeacock detail 1910
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Dorothy Benson, early 20th century machine embroidery for singer sewing machines. Dorothy ran the education side, and this piece of machine embroidery is unbelievably stitched without the use of a swing needle
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Barbara Snook's "Sea Eagle" late 20th century
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The Millenium Casket by Roy and Barbara Hirst
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Cas Holmes is one of the representatives to the collection for the 21st century.


Thank you Trish for a really inspirational and informative afternoon

Jude